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pokemon

Pokémon

“people like talking about pokemon”
Nameless Rumia

Pocket Monsters (ポケットモンスター), or Pokémon (ポケモン), is a long-running Japanese video game franchise that sparked a worldwide phenomenon. It was created by Satoshi Tajiri and the first few games of their core series were released in 1996 for handheld consoles.

Since 1998, the high-grossing franchise is managed by a three-way joint venture called The Pokémon Company. In recent years, they've had their fair brush of criticism over the years as the cash cow's quality has declined because of the tight release cadence.1)

Summary

This article is boring, lengthy, and may have bad opinions.

In the Pokémon universe, humans co-exist with creatures known as Pokémon. The general goal of the core games is to collect, raise, establish, and lead Pokémon teams, aiming to be one of the very best trainers. While it sounds simple, the games were really innovative for its time that it would spawn a long-running anime, generations of core and side games, trading cards, several manga series, and so forth.

Data and ramblings

Core timeline and multiverse

RGRSGSDPPtBWB2W2XY
– Toshinobu Matsumiya2)

Until recent years, the core Pokémon games had a vague chronological timeline, backed by the 2014 tweet from scenario writer Toshinobu Matsumiya.3) However, the company has shied away from it,4) and it all gets complicated when you factor in the confirmed multiverse. Despite these developments, there are efforts to keep this vague chronological timeline going, as shown on this page.

Hoenn Battle Frontier

This section contains brief summaries of the Hoenn Battle Frontier facilities and the intended experience, mostly to serve as a rough guideline for a ROM hack idea that will probably never happen.

  • Battle Factory - Choose from a random selection of Pokémon and see how far your team goes.
  • Battle Arena - You have three turns to beat your foe, then your performance is judged.
  • Battle Dome - Bring three, only use two. This becomes a tense guessing game as you progress.
  • Battle Pike - Select from three doors and hope for the best. It's all about taking risks.
  • Battle Palace - This facility mainly depends on your Pokémon's nature and how lucky you get.
  • Battle Pyramid - Calculate every move. Brave conditions, conserve power, find items, etc.
  • Battle Tower - Every single trainer usually has a useful held item. Sounds simple enough, yeah?

List of WTW cheat codes

Below is a handmade list of “Walk Through Walls” (WTW) cheat codes for the core Pokémon games, mostly the first three generations since I love looking at map layouts and newer generation hacks typically do not modify their maps. These shouldn't require any so-called “master codes” and presumably don't work with any cracktro versions. Help with the Japanese codes would be appreciated.5)

  • Pokémon Red/Green/Blue/Yellow (All):
    • 010138CD
  • Pokémon Gold/Silver (J) [1997 Demo]:6)
    • 010090CB 010091CB
      010092CB 010093CB
  • Pokémon Gold/Silver (J):
    • 010897CE 010898CE
      010899CE 01089ACE
  • Pokémon Gold/Silver (U):
    • 0108A3CE 0108A4CE
      0108A5CE 0108A6CE
  • Pokémon Crystal (J):
    • 01003ED1 01003FD1
      010040D1 010041D1
  • Pokémon Crystal (U):
    • 0100FAC2 0100FBC2
      0100FCC2 0100FDC2
  • Pokémon Ruby (U) [v1.0]:
    • CF010EDC CB42FC3A
      78DA95DF 44018CB4
  • Pokémon FireRed/LeafGreen (U) [v1.0]:
    • 509197D3 542975F4
      78DA95DF 44018CB4
  • Pokémon FireRed/LeafGreen (U) [v1.1]:
    • 167DCBA7 F604FFD2
      78DA95DF 44018CB4
  • Pokémon Emerald (J):
    • 11FE64BA 419C9474
      78DA95DF 44018CB4
  • Pokémon Emerald (U):
    • 7881A409 E2026E0C
      8E883EFF 92E9660D

Trainer ID events for RSE

The last digit of your trainer ID in Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald determines a few optional events that could be exchanged whenever you mix records with other players. It should be noted that record mixing across multiple languages is Emerald only. As record mixing was discontinued, the Old Guy and Secret Base trainer representative in Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire rely on completely different factors instead.

ID ends Old Guy Secret Base Trainer Daily Berry
Male Female
0 Bard Youngster Lass Figy Berry
1 Bard Bug Catcher School Kid♀ Wiki Berry*
2 Hipster Rich Boy Lady Mago Berry*
3 Hipster Camper Picknicker Aguav Berry*
4 Trader Cooltrainer♂ Cooltrainer♀ Iapapa Berry
5 Trader Youngster Lass Figy Berry
6 Storyteller Bug Catcher School Kid♀ Wiki Berry*
7 Storyteller Rich Boy Lady Mago Berry*
8 Giddy Camper Picknicker Aguav Berry*
9 Giddy Cooltrainer♂ Cooltrainer♀ Iapapa Berry

Note: This chart obviously doesn't include the Lilycove Pokemon Center Lady, since modulo is different than “ID ending in X”.

Translation analysis

Due to its international reach, the Pokémon franchise gets localized into many different languages, meaning that attack names, character names, monster names, events, and labels could potentially have all sorts of various names which can make things confusing, making it a prime subject for translation analysis. However, I can't realistically cover everything, so I'll probably write about something less taxing.

The 18 Pokémon Types

At the time of this writing, there are 18 types in the Pokémon franchise. Due to the sheer length of the chart, I've been forced to split the whole chart into two charts because it really eats a lot of space on desktop.

Japanese Name English Name
Literal Official
ノーマル
Nōmaru
Normal Normal
ほのお (炎)
Honō
Flame Fire
みず (水)
Mizu
Water Water
でんき (電気)
Denki
Electric Electric
くさ (草)
Kusa
Grass Grass
こおり (氷)
Kōri
Ice Ice
かくとう (格闘)
Kakutō
Fighting Fighting
どく (毒)
Doku
Poison Poison
じめん (地面)
Jimen
Ground Ground
Japanese Name English Name
Literal Official
ひこう (飛行)
Hikō
Flying Flying
エスパー
Esupā
Esper Psychic
むし (虫)
Mushi
Bug Bug
いわ (岩)
Iwa
Rock Rock
ゴースト
Gōsuto
Ghost Ghost
ドラゴン
Doragon
Dragon Dragon
あく (悪)
Aku
Evil Dark
はがね (鋼)
Hagane
Steel Steel
フェアリー
Fearī
Fairy Fairy

Johto Week Siblings

In the Johto story, there is a set of non-playable characters that will show up on certain days of the week. The following chart is a compilation of their names, next to the respective day of the week in the language.

MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN
JA ツキコ
(月曜日)
ヒコ
(火曜日)
ミズオ
(水曜日)
モクオ
(木曜日)
カネコ
(金曜日)
ツチオ
(土曜日)
ニチオ
(日曜日)
Tsuhiko
(Getsuyōbi)
Hiko
(Kayōbi)
Mizuo
(Suiyōbi)
Mokuo
(Mokuyōbi)
Kaneko
(Kinyōbi)
Tsuchio
(Doyōbi)
Nichio
(Nichiyōbi)
EN Monica
(Monday)
Tuscany
(Tuesday)
Wesley
(Wednesday)
Arthur
(Thursday)
Frieda
(Friday)
Santos
(Saturday)
Sunny
(Sunday)
FR Lucie
(lundi)
Marie
(mardi)
Homer
(mercredi)
Jerome
(jeudi)
Vanessa
(vendredi)
Samuel
(samedi)
Dimitri
(dimanche)
DE Monja
(Montag)
Dietlinde
(Dienstag)
Mitko
(Mittwoch)
Donatus
(Donnerstag)
Frieda
(Freitag)
Samson
(Samstag)
Sonnfried
(Sonntag)
IT Luana
(lunedì)
Marta
(martedì)
Ercole
(mercoledì)
Giorgio
(giovedì)
Veronica
(venerdì)
Sabatino
(sabato)
Dorino
(domenica)
ES Luna
(lunes)
Marta
(martes)
Miguel
(miércoles)
Josué
(jueves)
Vicky
(viernes)
Sabino
(sábado)
Domingo
(domingo)
KO 월희
(월요일)
화홍
(화요일)
수방
(수요일)
목인
(목요일)
금순
(금요일)
토영
(토요일)
일식
(일요일)
Wolhui
(Woryoil)
Hwahong
(Hwayoil)
Subang
(Suyoil)
Mogin
(Mogyoil)
Geumsun
(Geumyoil)
Toyeong
(Toyoil)
Ilsik
(Iryoil)
Wŏrhŭi
(Wŏryoil)
Kŭmsun
(Kŭmyoil)
T'oyŏng
(T'oyoil)
ZH7) 星琪怡
(星期一)
星琪兒
(星期二)
星琪山
(星期三)
星琪思
(星期四)
星琪舞
(星期五)
星琪柳
(星期六)
星琪天
(星期天)
Xīng Qíyí
(xīngqí yī)
Xīng Qí'ér
(xīngqí èr)
Xīng Qíshān
(xīngqí sān)
Xīng Qísī
(xīngqí sì)
Xīng Qíwǔ
(xīngqí wǔ)
Xīng Qíliǔ
(xīngqí liù)
Xīng Qítiān
(xīngqí tiān)
Sīng Kèihyìh
(sīngkèih-yāt)
Sīng Kèihyìh
(sīngkèih-yih)
Sīng Kèihsāan
(sīngkèih-sāam)
Sīng Kèihsī
(sīngkèih-sei)
Sīng Kèihmóuh
(sīngkèih-ngh)
Sīng Kèihláuh
(sīngkèih-luhk)
Sīng Kèihtīn
(sīngkèih-tīn)
SV8)
(Unofficial)
Monica
(Måndag)
Lisa
(Tisdag)
Jonsa
(Onsdag)
Tore
(Torsdag)
Fredrika
(Fredag)
Larry
(Lördag)
Sönne
(Söndag)
RU9)
(Unofficial)
Пенни
(понедельник)
Вита
(вторник)
Серджи
(среда)
Чет
(четверг)
Пэтти
(пятница)
Сабби
(суббота)
Весси
(воскресенье)
Penni
(ponedelnik)
Vita
(vtornik)
Serdzhi
(sreda)
Chet
(chetverg)
Petti
(pyatnitsa)
Sabbi
(subbota)
Vessi
(voskresenye)
MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN

Pokémon's name in China

While Pokémon was introduced to China in 1998, the PRC would enact a ban on video game consoles from 2000 to 2014 that killed localization efforts since Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, and Singapore weren't large enough to justify the amount of resources needed to localization the games.10) Instead, Pokémon was mainly experienced through the anime, manga, and bootleg/imported copies.

As a result, the Pokémon franchise would assume several different names amongst Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking audiences for many years. The Pokemon Company eventually decided to settle on “Bǎokěmèng” (宝可梦) as the official Chinese name going forward, as they wanted to keep the pronunciation consistent according to a Chinese-exclusive Nintendo Direct in 2016,11) finalizing this in 2019.12)

Chinese Romanized Literal meaning Usage notes
Traditional Simplified Mandarin Cantonese
寵物小精靈 宠物小精灵 Chǒngwù Xiǎojīnglíng Chúngmaht Síujīnglìhng Lovable Small Creatures
(Housepet Elf)
The original mainland name, which apparently stuck in Hong Kong.
小精靈 小精灵 Xiǎojīnglíng Síujīnglìhng Small Creatures
(Elf)
神奇的口袋中的寶貝 神奇的口袋中的宝贝 Shénqí de kǒudài zhōngde bǎobèi Sàhnkèih dīk háudói jūngdīk bóubui Mystical Creatures in Pocket The original name in Taiwan and temporarily unified name, which 52Poké still utilizes.
神奇寶貝 神奇宝贝 Shénqí Bǎobèi Sàhnkèih Bóubui Mystical Creatures
(Magical Treasure)
精靈寶可夢 精灵宝可梦 Jīnglíng Bǎokěmèng Jīnglìhng Bóuhómuhng Pokémon Creatures The previous unified name in the mainland, which borrows from previous used names.
寶可夢 宝可梦 Bǎokěmèng Bóuhómuhng Pokémon The main unified name since 2019.13)
Unofficial names for Pokémon in bootleg cartridges
口袋妖怪 Kǒudài Yāoguài Háudói Yīugwaai Pocket Monster The unofficial mainland name. Do note that Yaoguai & Youkai are written the same.
口袋寶石 口袋宝石 Kǒudài Bǎoshí Háudói Bóusehk Pocket Precious The old name used by Shenzhen Nanjing.
口袋怪獸 口袋怪兽 Kǒudài Guàishòu Háudói Gwaaisau Rare Pocket Monster The common bootleg name, used by Shenzhen Nanjing, Henggedianzi, Jncota, Vast Fame, etc.
口袋精靈 口袋精灵 Kǒudài Jīnglíng Háudói Jīnglìhng Pocket Creatures The bootleg name used by Mars and Waixing.

Treasures of Ruin

The four Ruinous Pokémon in Scarlet and Violet use Chinese names, but the official localization team made an odd decision to use the archaic Wade–Giles system over the Hanyu Pinyin system. This was fixed in the French and German version, though they base it on the Japanese name. Meanwhile, the Chinese translation adds “gǔ” (古, lit. “old”) and changed the first two names for some reason.14)

Dex no. Forms Romanizations
Old New Mandarin Cantonese
Hanyu
Pinyin
Gwoyeu
Romatzyh
Wade–
Giles
Yale Jyutping
#1001 JA 蟲𥳑 虫簡 chóngjiǎn chorngjean ch'ung2-chien3 chùhng-gáan cung4-gaan2
EN 蝸簡 蜗简 wōjiǎn uojean wo1-chien3 wō-gáan wo1-gaan2
ZH 古簡蝸 古简蜗 gǔjiǎnwō guujeanuo ku3 chien3-wo1 gú gáan-wō gu2 gaan2-wo1
#1002 JA 豹劍 豹剣 bàojiàn bawjiann pao4-chien4 paau-gim paau3-gim3
EN 劍豹 剑豹 jiànbào jiannbaw chien4-pao4 gim-paau gim3-paau3
ZH 古劍豹 古剑豹 gǔjiànbào guujiannbaw ku3 chien4-pao4 gú gim-paau gu2 gim3-paau3
#1003 JA 鼎鹿 dǐnglù diingluh ting3-lu4 díng-luhk ding2-luk6
EN
ZH 古鼎鹿 gǔdǐnglù guudiingluh ku3 ting3-lu4 gú díng-luhk gu2 ding2-luk6
#1004 JA 玉魚 yùyú yuhyu 4-yü2 yuhk-yùh juk6-jyu4
EN 鯽玉 鲫玉 jìyù jihyuh chi4-yü4 jīk-yuhk zik1-juk6
ZH 古玉魚 古玉鱼 gǔyùyú guuyuhyu ku34-yü2 gú yuhk-yùh gu2 juk6-jyu4

Note: “Old” = Kyūjitai (Japanese) and Traditional Chinese. “New” = Shinjitai (Japanese) and Simplified Chinese.

Notes

  • It's often mentioned that Dragon Quest and MOTHER were major inspirations for Pokémon.
    • The latter is rather obvious, given that Tsunekazu Ishihara had previously worked at Ape Inc. before establishing Creatures Inc. which hired former staff members of said company.
    • In the 2019 GameCenter CX interview, Shigesato Itoi confirms that the team who “stepped up” to develop EarthBound (MOTHER 2) is the same team developing the Pokémon franchise.15)
  • A handful of notes on the Japanese versions of the first generation Pokémon games:
    • The Japanese RGB boxart has this screenshot of a Lv. 5 Charmander named Sepultura,16) fighting against a Lv. 18 Pidgeotto that likely belongs to the rival in Cerulean City.
      • It was later referenced in XY by an NPC on Route 21, specifically the Japanese, English, and Korean versions, though it was edited out for Spanish, German, French, and Italian.17)
    • For some reason, an Indian elephant (インドぞう, Indo zou) is oddly mentioned in the Pokédex entries for Raichu and Gastly in the Japanese version of Red and Green. These were later recycled for the international versions of FireRed, then it carried over to Raichu in Sun while Gastly had a brand new entry written for them.
    • “Lavender Town Syndrome” (シオンタウン症候群, Shion Taun Shōkōgun) isn't real, kid.18)
  • The Japanese name for the Eeveelutions is technically “Ībuizu” (イーブイズ) or “EVs”, but everyone typically calls them the “Buizu” (ブイズ), “Vees”, or “Vs” instead.19)
    • Unlike the international names, the Japanese names does not utilize a common suffix or pattern: Showers, Thunders, Booster, Eifie, Blacky, Leafia, Glacia, and Nymphia.
  • According to illustrator Ken Sugimori, the male protagonist of RSE (and ORAS) is wearing a knit cap,20) alternatively known as a beanie, a toboggan, a toque, a watch cap, a winter hat, etc.
  • I personally believe that Green is the boy, Blue is the girl, and Blue and Leaf are the same person.
  • Some of the protagonists' original Japanese names were previously used as generic trainer names:
    • Kouki (コウキ) was a male Cooltrainer's name (Edgar) in Emerald's Victory Road.
    • Hikari (ヒカリ) was a female Psychic's name (Maura) in RSE's Mossdeep Gym.
    • Kotone (コトネ) was a Channeler's name (Patricia) in FRLG and LGPE's Pokémon Tower.
    • Touya (トウヤ) was a male Psychic's name (Greg) in HGSS's Route 37.21)
    • Touko (トウコ) was a female Swimmer's name (Marcy) in RSE's Battle TowerRS/FrontierE, as well as a female Picnicker's name (Marcy) in FRLG's Pattern Bush.22)
  • In BW, “The Riches” in Undella Town are called “Bourgeoir” (ブルジョワール) in Japanese, directly referencing the bourgeoisie. This is retained in the Chinese, Korean, and Italian versions.
  • The game color palettes were directly borrowed from Bulbapedia, specifically the lighter palettes.23)
  • Please stop recommending me infamously bad ROM hacks of Pokémon.

See also

Japanese links

English links


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1)
Please don't talk to me about >DLC or >patches, I've been hearing these same excuses ever since ORAS skimped out on the Battle Frontier in 2014. Anybody who responds to this critique by bringing up the National Dex movement, when nobody brought it up, is just trying to straw man and should be ignored.
5)
I've been trying to find a “walk through walls” cheat for the Japanese version of Pokémon FireRed, but I haven't gotten anywhere with this. They use “PAR” (Pro Action Replay) for GameShark codes and, apparently, the equivalent term for “walk through walls” is “kabenuke” (壁抜け, lit. “walking through walls”) or “shōgaibutsu mushi” (障害物無視, lit. “ignoring obstacles”) from my understanding.
6)
If you're playing the debug mode version: press “Select” on the title screen, go to “Field” (フィールド), then hold down the “B” button while walking to activate the “walk through walls” cheat.
7)
For the Chinese names: the Mandarin romanization is followed by the Cantonese romanization.
8)
The Swedish fan translation of Pokémon Silver by “Cyndeline Translations” is used here.
9)
The Russian fan translation of Pokémon Crystal by “Shedevr” (Шедевр) is used here. Gallery.
10)
Despite no official Chinese-language localization at the time, do note that Japanese-language copies did end up in these regions, given the historical event Pokémon distribution (e.g. PokéPark Mew, etc.).
11)
"有關Pokémon最新資訊" [EN version] (February 26, 2016). YouTube.
14)
The first change is understandable as most people would read “chóng” (虫) as “bug” instead of “animal”, which would've resulted in jokes of “bug” being in its name despite it not being a Bug-type Pokémon and incredibly weak to Bug-type Pokémon as a Dark/Grass Pokémon, so it became “wō/guā” (蜗) for “snail” in the localizations. The second change is just a swap.
15)
"A Good Bat and a Bigger Map" (September 16, 2019). 1101.
16)
“Sepultura”, notably rendered as “separutora” (セパルトラ) instead of “sepurutura” (セプルトゥラ), is the Spanish and Portuguese word for “grave”, joking about the underleveled Pokémon's grave situation.
17)
The word “sepultura” (Spanish/Portuguese), when translated to other romance languages, becomes “sépulture” (French) and “sepoltura” (Italian). I would assume that the German version likely followed suit as it would've ended up in Northern Italy, considering the Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol autonomous region.
18)
"Shion Town". Niconico Encyclopedia.
20)
"@meowthcollector ニット帽子です!" (February 24, 2011). Twitter.
21)
In GSC, the male Psychic was originally named “Ryō” (リョウ) in the Japanese version. For some reason, the trainer names in Route 37 were changed for HGSS, but the English version kept “Greg”.
22)
The fact that two trainers had the same name in Japanese and English suggests that they used a list. This did not carry over in Chinese, which uses “Chéngyíng” (澄瑩) and “Tòuzǐ” (透子) respectively.
23)
For the curator's own convenience: RGBY, GSC, RSE + FRLG, DPPt + HGSS, BW + B2W2, XY + ORAS, SM + USUM + LGPE, SwSh + BDSP, SV.
pokemon.txt · Last modified: 2024-05-28 10:27:00 by namelessrumia